MHS Science Department

At Mamaroneck High School, the goal of science instruction is to ensure that all students are provided with the essential skills and knowledge for success in the 21st century. Never before has our world been so complex and science knowledge so critical to making sense of it all. When comprehending current events, choosing and using technology, or making informed decisions about one’s healthcare, science understanding is key. Science is also at the heart of the United States’ ability to continue to innovate, lead, and create the jobs of the future.

With this in mind, the Science department at MHS offers a variety of choices to ensure that our students have access to a wide variety of classes designed to support any aspirations. Our classes give students access to a wealth of knowledge and information which will contribute to an overall understanding of how and why things work like they do.

All classes are lab and inquiry based. In addition, teachers assure that when learning about science, students are also enhancing their skills in reading, writing and math.

Regents Biology (The Living Environment)

This class is taken by all incoming freshman and emphasizes an in depth understanding of major concepts rather than memorization of science facts. The goal is to get students interested and excited about the the scientific world around them.

Lab and activity intensive, key topics include: Characteristics of Living Systems, basic human anatomy and physiology ,classical and modern genetics, evolution, and ecology.

In addition to state labs, students have an opportunity to do dissections design their own experiments.

Regents Chemistry (The Physical Setting)

This laboratory based Chemistry course is designed to provide students with a solid understanding of the nature of matter and its interactions which underlie all other scientific disciplines, preparing students to undertake more advanced study in these fields.

Topics include matter and energy, atomic structure, bonding, the periodic table, stoichiometry, solutions, kinetics and equilibrium, acids and bases, redox reactions and electrochemistry, organic chemistry and nuclear chemistry.

Laboratory activities include atomic spectrum analysis, acid base titrations, double replacement reactions and making ice cream.

Applied Chemistry

Less math intensive, this non-regents chemistry course focuses on applying the concepts of chemistry to everyday life. Focus is on environmental, biological and consumer chemistry.

Laboratory investigations include water purity, acid rain, consumer chemistry, and pollution. Reading and discussion current event articles is also an integral part of the class.

Physics

This course is a comprehensive survey of the fundamental concepts of physics. This course is designed to foster the development of critical thinking skills. Typically, four classes per week will be devoted to lecture and problem solving. One or two classes per week are devoted to performing laboratory activities.

The goal in the laboratory is to explore and, whenever possible, validate the laws and concepts learned in theory.

Conceptual Physics

This course provides a conceptually-based exposure to the fundamental principles and processes of the physical world. Topics include basic concepts of motion, forces, energy, heat, electricity, magnetism, and the structure of matter and the universe. Nonmathematical discussions of concepts and practical applications will be stressed.

Gaining insight to the rules of nature can change the way the students interact and perceive things. The knowledge that students gain in this course will help them in life as it will change the way they observe the world; allowing them to become better problem solvers.

AP Physics 1

AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based, introductory college- level physics course that explores topics such as: Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits.

AP Biology

The primary emphasis of AP Biology is on developing an understanding of concepts; a grasp of science as a process rather than as an accumulation of facts; personal experience in scientific inquiry; recognition of unifying themes that integrate the major topics of biology; and the application of biological knowledge and critical thinking to environmental and social concerns.

Topics covered in the course include chemistry of life, cells and cell energetics, heredity, molecular genetics, evolution, diversity of organisms, structure and function of both plants and animals, and ecology.

Instruction is designed to provide students with a variety of appropriate learning opportunities through diverse teaching strategies. These include class discussions, collaborative pairs work, laboratories, Internet research and activities, and various hands on activities. Students will also have an opportunity to design their own experiments and learn cutting edge DNA analysis techniques with their own DNA.

AP Chemistry

AP Chemistry provides students with a college- level foundation to support future advanced coursework in chemistry. It is designed to encourage the development of the fundamental concepts and principles of chemistry. There is an emphasis on inquiry and critical thinking skills, which include problem solving, mathematical reasoning, and experimental investigations.

Students will gain a deep understanding of chemistry's core concepts, and apply them to solve complex problems.

Instruction is designed to provide students with a variety of appropriate learning opportunities through diverse teaching strategies. These include class discussions, collaborative pairs work, laboratories, Internet research and activities, hands on activities, and student prepared presentations.

AP Environmental Science

The AP Environmental Science course is designed to be the equivalent of a one-semester, introductory college course in environmental science. Environmental Science is interdisciplinary, embracing topics from geology, biology, environmental studies, environmental science, chemistry, and geography.

The course requires that students identify and analyze natural and human-made environmental problems, evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them.

In addition to labs, students take field trips to the local water treatment facility, Sheldrake Nature Conservancy, and participate in various community events.

AP Physics 2

AP Physics 2 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understanding of physics through inquiry-based statics and dynamics; thermodynamics with kinetic theory; PV diagrams and probability; electrostatics; electromagnetism; physical and geometric optics; and quantum, atomic, and nuclear physics.

AP Physics C

Mechanics is equivalent to a one-semester, calculus- based, college-level physics course, especially appropriate for students planning to specialize or major in physical science or engineering. The course explores topics such as kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion; work, energy, and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; and oscillations and gravitation. Introductory differential and integral calculus is used throughout the course.

Electricity and Magnetism is a one-semester, calculus- based, college-level physics course, especially appropriate for students planning to specialize or major in physical science or engineering. The course explores topics such as electrostatics; conductors, capacitors, electromagnetism. Introductory differential and integral calculus is used throughout the course.

Anatomy

This course will emphasize the anatomy (structures) and physiology (functions) of the human body. The eleven body systems will be studied and the course will also emphasize histology, metabolism, and overall biological organization.

In addition to developing a basic knowledge of the eleven systems, students will understand how each system is related to the others, in both structure and function. Students will become acquainted with various diseases and disorders involving each system.

Lab exercises emphasize anatomical and physiological aspects of the human. Dissections, live or virtual, are a part of the class. Class discussion, student presentations, and internet sources are also integral parts of the class.

Forensics

Forensic Science is the application of science to criminal and civil laws that are enforced by police agencies in a criminal justice system. This is a comprehensive senior elective incorporating Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Entomology, Earth Science, Anatomy and Physiology as well as other aspects of Science.

Major topics include crime scene processing , collecting and preserving evidence, identifying types of physical evidence, organic and inorganic analysis of evidence, hair, fibers, and paint, toxicology, arson and explosion investigations, serology, fingerprints, firearms, document analysis and cutting edge DNA technologies.

All topics have corresponding labs and MHS is lucky enough to have many community members donating time to share their expertise with.

Introduction to Original Research

This extracurricular program consists of two ten-week modules meeting twice a week before school. Students will learn research techniques and engage in short investigations during which they will gain experience in experimental design and the analysis of carried out in the Original Research program.

Original Research 1, 2, and 3

In this course students will participate in the community original research. In addition to class meetings, students will have an individual conference every two weeks. Students will conduct online bibliographic searches using the Internet and DIALOG information retrieval systems, and they will communicate with professional two years, they will produce completed research papers describing their experiments. Students are expected to participate in our annual symposium and to enter competitions. All aspects of the work are portfolio.

Students may earn a total of 12 college credits through the University in the High School program of the University at Albany, SUNY. Two credits may be earned for work during each summer, and 4 credits may be awarded at the end of the junior and senior years. A greatly reduced fee must be paid to earn the college credits.

Depending on an individual student’s program, participation in science research may require the requirement.